Wednesday, November 15, 2006

If It Ain't Broke...

We all know about the digital revolution in Hollywood. We all know they can do amazing things with computer graphics, etc. And we also know that for some years now they have been sprucing up old movies with new technology.

This is a terrible idea and DIH wishes it would stop.

Ever watch one of the re-released classics? They're awesome, man! I mean, they've just done the most amazing stuff! They're so much clearer now! Check out the new "Wizard of Oz"- you can sooo see the strings holding up the Cowardly Lion's tail! And "Singing In The Rain"? That scene where Gene Kelly's dancing int he rain and we film buffs all know the sound was just out of sync? Well now you can REALLY tell! He's "tapping" at the wrong times, man! This is so awesome!

I know there are some stupid people in Hollywood, but you'd think even they could figure this one out.

Stop ruining the great movies, dudes. Generations will thank you.

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

Is that why Big Girl noticed it? I had never noticed that in all the gazillions of times I'd seen it, including on our video cassette. We bought the DVD because it was easier to skip ahead to the Lion's parts (Hubby was him for Halloween at the office), and Big Girl suddenly said, "Look! I see the string holding up the Lion's tail!"

Didn't notice the tapping in Singin' in the Rain, though. But the girls watched it three times before we sent it back to Netflix.

I guess I don't mind the restoration stuff, but I tell ya', I'd really like to SMACK Ted "let's-colorize-perfectly-good-movies-so-they-look-like-crap" Turner.

It's a Wonderful Life and Miracle on 34th Street are just not the same in color. Yuck.

Joke said...

What? Stupid people in Hollywood? No!

-J.

P.S. Does that mean George Clooney is likely not a Mensan?

Jeffus said...

I swear the last time I saw "Casablanca", Ingrid Bergman no longer says about Sam "that BOY over there." And her lips now form new words. Hollywood is just an early adopter in the new world of digital historical revisionism.